Stem Cell Researcher Says It's Too Soon to Cheer About Recent Stem Cell Findings

Aug 25, 2006

Recently, scientists announced that they had found a way to establish colonies of human embryonic stem cells without destroying a human embryo. University of Missouri-Columbia researcher Elmer Price, who works with adult stem cells, said this discovery is a step in the right direction, but a lot of work is still necessary to determine if these particular stem cells will be effective for any kind of therapy.

"This method to obtain duplicate embryos has been used in animals for years," Price said. "In terms of human embryonic stem cells, this is a good step, but we need additional research to see if we are headed in the right direction. These are the types of steps that scientists working with both kinds of stem cells, embryonic and adult, need to take."

Price is an associate professor of biomedical sciences and researcher at the MU Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center. Price's research focuses on adult stem cells and potential treatments for vascular and neurological diseases. He is a member of the American Physiological Society and has been awarded research grants from the NIH, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, the UM Research Board and the MO Spinal Cord Injury Research Program.

Source: University of Missouri

Explore further: UK dyslexia charities should give balanced view on expensive lenses to improve reading

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Animal-free reprogramming of adult cells improves safety

Aug 13, 2014

Human stem cells produced through genetic reprogramming are beset by safety concerns because current techniques alter the DNA of the stem cells and use material from animals to grow them. Now, A*STAR researchers ...

On the frontiers of cyborg science

Aug 10, 2014

No longer just fantastical fodder for sci-fi buffs, cyborg technology is bringing us tangible progress toward real-life electronic skin, prosthetics and ultraflexible circuits. Now taking this human-machine concept to an ...

How plants grow and develop

Aug 08, 2014

How does a complete plant with stems, leafs and flowers develop from a tiny clump of seemingly identical cells? For a very long time, the mechanism of tissue formation in plants remained unclear. The biochemists ...

Recommended for you

Common antibiotic linked with heart deaths

6 hours ago

The antibiotic clarithromycin—widely used for treating common bacterial infections—is associated with an increased risk of heart deaths, finds a study published in the BMJ today.

User comments : 0