Health officials want more PE in schools

Aug 23, 2006

The American Heart Association says U.S. schools are failing to provide enough exercise for school-age children who are growing fatter each year.

The 2006 Shape of the Nation report, a joint effort between the conducted by the American Heart Association and the National Association for Sport and Physical Education, says most states are failing to provide students with adequate physical education requirements, CNN reported.

The report, released in May, said nearly a third of all states do not mandate physical education for elementary and middle school students. Twelve states allow students to earn required physical education credits through online physical education courses.

CNN said some critics contend that the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 may be unintentionally forcing schools to cut time and resources for exercise as educators focus more on test scores and rigorous academics.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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