Lexapro lawsuit filed against Forest Labs

Jul 26, 2006

A lawsuit has been filed against U.S.-based Forest Laboratories involving the deaths of two men taking the drug company's antidepressant, Lexapro.

The lawsuit was filed by Mark and Lucy Bibbee, who claim Lexapro caused both their sons -- their only children -- to commit suicide 17 months apart, the Akron (Ohio) Beacon Journal reported.

David Bibbee, 27, who suffered from bipolar disorder, took his own life Feb. 23, 2003, at his father's Stow, Ohio, home. Brian Bibbee, 24, who was receiving medical help for attention deficit disorder, died July 24, 2004, at his mother's Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, home.

Both men were taking Lexapro, which has been linked with an increased risk of suicide.

The lawsuit claims Forest knew of the increased suicide risk, yet failed to conduct tests to see how often the problem developed and also failed to properly issue warnings, the Beacon Journal said.

Mark and Lucy Bibbee "believe this drug was the cause of both of their sons' deaths," attorney Charles Grisi told the newspaper. "They're pursuing this ... in hopes no other family will have to experience this tragedy."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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