Infections in youth linked to diabetes

Jul 04, 2006

British researchers have found an association between common infections in children and the later development of Type 1 diabetes.

Researchers from the universities of Newcastle and Leeds analyzed the medical histories of more than 4,000 patients under the age of 29 who had been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in the Yorkshire region over a 25-year period, The Times of London reported Tuesday.

Among those who had been diagnosed with a childhood infection, 6 to 7 percent more cases of Type 1 diabetes were found than would have been expected by chance. The incidence rose to between 7 and 14 percent in females.

Diabetes develops if the body cannot produce insulin, and Type 1 usually appears before the age of 40.

Simon O'Neill, director of care and policy at Diabetes UK, said the latest findings, published in the journal Diabetologia, was part of a growing body of research.

"This research reinforces the idea that common infections and environmental factors also play a part," O'Neill said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: OCD patients' brains light up to reveal how compulsive habits develop

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Microbiome may have shaped early human populations

3 hours ago

We humans have an exceptional age structure compared to other animals: Our children remain dependent on their parents for an unusually long period and our elderly live an extremely long time after they have ...

Big-data analysis reveals gene sharing in mice

3 hours ago

Rice University scientists have detected at least three instances of cross-species mating that likely influenced the evolutionary paths of "old world" mice, two in recent times and one in the distant past.

Recommended for you

Medical marijuana helpful for cancer-linked symptoms

10 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Cannabis and cannabinoid pharmaceuticals can be helpful for nausea and vomiting, pain, and weight loss associated with cancer, according to research published online Dec. 10 in CA: A Cancer Jo ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.