Vaginal birth safe after C-sections

Jun 30, 2006
Feet of a newborn baby

A study published in a prominent medical journal says even women who have had multiple Caesarian sections can safely deliver a baby vaginally.

The study in Obstetrics and Gynecology found that the incidence of uterine tears or ruptures from a vaginal birth were only slightly higher in women who had more than one Cesarean, USA Today reported Friday.

Of the nearly 18,000 women involved in the study, ruptures occurred in 0.9 percent of women with multiple previous C-sections and 0.7 percent of women with one C-section.

Lead author Mark Landon, professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Ohio State University in Columbus, said most practitioners have shied from offering vaginal births to women with multiple prior Cesareans because of a perceived risk of uterine rupture, the newspaper reported.

The study showed if such women have an increased risk of rupture, it must be quite small, Landon said.

As a result of the findings a spokesman for the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Gary Hankins, told USA Today he expects his group will revise its advice for women who've had multiple C-sections.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: New survey of employers about the health insurance market

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Senators get no clear answers on air bag safety

1 hour ago

There were apologies and long-winded explanations, but after nearly four hours of testimony about exploding Takata air bags, senators never got a clear answer to the question most people have: whether or ...

Nicaragua: Studies say canal impact to be minimal

1 hour ago

Officials said Thursday that studies have determined a $40 billion inter-oceanic canal across Nicaragua will have minimal impact on the environment and society, and construction is to begin next month.

Former Brown dean whose group won Nobel Prize dies

2 hours ago

David Greer, a doctor who co-founded a group that won the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize for working to prevent nuclear war and who helped transform the medical school at Brown University, has died. He was 89.

Recommended for you

Brain-dwelling worm in UK man's head sequenced

2 hours ago

For the first time, the genome of a rarely seen tapeworm has been sequenced. The genetic information of this invasive parasite, which lived for four years in a UK resident's brain, offers new opportunities ...

US seniors' health poorest, global survey shows

3 hours ago

(HealthDay)— Seniors in America have more chronic health problems and take more medications than seniors in 10 other industrialized countries do, according to a new global survey. The United States also ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.