Japanese court rules for vaccinated men

Jun 18, 2006

Japan's Supreme Court ordered the government to pay 27.5 million yen because five men became gravely ill after completing a mandatory vaccination program.

Four men and the family of a deceased man were awarded 5.5 million yen each.

The Japan Times reports that the men participated in a government program aimed at vaccinating against the hepatitis B virus, but the program employed used needles.

Presiding Justice Ryoji Nakagawa overruled the 2004 Sapporo High Court's findings that two of the five men had lost their chances at compensation because the 20-year statute of limitations had expired.

The had court agreed that the inoculation program had probably caused them to become infected with hepatitis B, and said the statute of limitations should be calculated from the onset of the disease, not the inoculation.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Two US states order tough Ebola quarantine rules

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Nokia turnaround since handset unit sale continues

2 hours ago

Nokia appears to have turned around its fortunes after the sale of its ailing cellphone unit to Microsoft, reporting a third-quarter net profit of 747 million euros ($950 million), from a loss of 91 million euros a year earlier. ...

Yahoo CEO defends strategy in face of criticism

2 hours ago

Signaling her reign has reached a pivotal juncture, Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer is trying to convince restless shareholders that the long-struggling Internet company is heading in the right direction.

Recommended for you

Two US states order tough Ebola quarantine rules

13 hours ago

New York and New Jersey on Friday ordered a mandatory quarantine for medics who treated victims of Ebola in West Africa, after the deadly virus spread to America's largest city.

NY and NJ say they will require Ebola quarantines

Oct 24, 2014

The governors of New Jersey and New York on Friday ordered a mandatory, 21-day quarantine for all doctors and other arriving travelers who have had contact with Ebola victims in West Africa.

User comments : 0