HIV-related brain problems are studied

Apr 27, 2006

Scripps Research Institute scientists have shed new light on the molecular basis of brain function problems associated with immune deficiency viruses.

The La Jolla, Calif., researchers used viruses similar to the HIV, or human immunodeficiency virus, the cause of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or AIDS. They said their findings may ultimately lead to new therapeutic interventions to prevent or reverse nervous system disorders in HIV-infected individuals.

Using multi-disciplinary analysis -- including cognitive, neurophysiologic, virologic, and molecular techniques -- the team found both a low-level viral infection in the brain as well as immune cells that had infiltrated the brain in order to protect against the virus.

"As in the rest of the body, in the brain immune cells achieve a level of control of the virus, but are unable to clear the infection," said lead author Howard Fox, an associate professor at Scripps Research and director of Scripps NeuroAIDS Preclinical Studies Center. "Over the long-term, this immune response may act as a double-edged sword, protecting against rampant viral replication in the brain, but leading to brain dysfunction."

The study appears in the Journal of Neuroscience.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Fruit and veggies pave the road to happiness

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Scientists create vaccine against heroin high

Jul 20, 2011

Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute have developed a highly successful vaccine against a heroin high and have proven its therapeutic potential in animal models.

Scientists find measles' natural nemesis

Jan 20, 2011

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have found that a known enzyme in cells protects against measles virus, likely by altering the virus's genetic material, RNA. Cells lacking the enzyme become highly vulnerable ...

Recommended for you

iPads detect early signs of glaucoma in Nepal eye screening

7 minutes ago

Using a tablet screening app could prove to be an effective method to aid in the effort to reduce the incidence of avoidable blindness in populations at high-risk for glaucoma with limited access to health care, according ...

Invading worms cause the body to shut down defenses

17 minutes ago

When parasitic worms invade muscle tissue, white blood cells called eosinophils rush to the scene. A study published in the Journal of Immunology this month reveals that these cells actually start a chai ...

EU tackles Ebola response

1 hour ago

European Union foreign ministers thrashed out measures to help halt Ebola's deadly spread on Monday, as Nigeria—Africa's most populous country—was expected to be declared free of the disease.

User comments : 0