Medical journal ethics questioned again

July 19, 2006

Another U.S. medical journal ethics case arose this week, this time involving Dr. Charles Nemeroff, the editor of the journal Neuropsychopharmacology.

Nemeroff, a well known psychiatrist, favorably reviewed a controversial new treatment for depression, only to later announce a correction will be published.

The Nashville, Tenn.-based, journal failed to cite the ties of the article's eight academic authors to the company that makes the treatment -- including the article's lead author -- Nemeroff, The Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday.

It was just the latest incident in which several medical journals neglected to identify relationships between researchers and companies that might benefit from positive research reports. As a result, journals are being urged to ban offending authors from publication and medical schools urged to more closely watch relationships between their researchers and the pharmaceutical industry.

Last week, the Chicago-published Journal of the American Medical Association announced seven authors of a February paper on pregnancy depression neglected to reveal they were paid by the makers of antidepressants -- the third such incident at JAMA this year, The Wall Street Journal said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Rules of communication in the nucleus

Related Stories

Rules of communication in the nucleus

August 28, 2015

Nuclear pores in the nuclear membrane do not only control the transport of molecules into and out of the nucleus but also play an important role in gene expression. Researchers at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL) of ...

Recommended for you

Smart home heating and cooling

August 28, 2015

Smart temperature-control devices—such as thermostats that learn and adjust to pre-programmed temperatures—are poised to increase comfort and save energy in homes.

Smallest 3-D camera offers brain surgery innovation

August 28, 2015

To operate on the brain, doctors need to see fine details on a small scale. A tiny camera that could produce 3-D images from inside the brain would help surgeons see more intricacies of the tissue they are handling and lead ...

Fractals patterns in a drummer's music

August 28, 2015

Fractal patterns are profoundly human – at least in music. This is one of the findings of a team headed by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization in Göttingen and Harvard University ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.