Concerns rise over waived-consents

Jun 14, 2006

Concern is growing in the Untied States over waived consents that could lead a person to unknowingly become a test subject in a medical trial.

Critics want to know whether people understand how consents work and whether they are given adequate protection when they become test subjects, reports USA Today.

The report said Wednesday's edition of the Journal of American Medical Association talks of a trial that was halted because a device used to revive cardiac-arrest victims failed to save more lives than when rescuers performed cardio-pulmonary resuscitation.

The JAMA study says as many as 10 people in one city may not have been revived because of their participation.

The newspaper said patients in such studies, which are often financed by manufacturers of the tested product, are treated under a broad federal rule. That rule allows researchers to test emergency treatments on patients with specific, life-threatening medical conditions without their explicit consent as long as they remain under close watch of independent reviewers.

Supporters say there is no substitute for such testing in emergency cases of life-and-death situations.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Health professionals may view family-witnessed CPR negatively

Related Stories

Fitness trackers are hot, but do they really help?

Jun 18, 2015

Sales of fitness trackers are climbing, and the biggest maker of the gadgets, Fitbit, made a splashy debut on the stock market Thursday. But will the devices really help you get healthier?

Recommended for you

Asian-language smoking quitline successful nationwide

1 hour ago

(HealthDay)—An Asian-Language Smokers Quitline (ASQ) reaches Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese speakers nationwide, and most callers receive medication and counseling, according to a study published online ...

Many Americans trying to cut their salt intake: CDC

1 hour ago

(HealthDay)—Worried about links between high daily salt intake, high blood pressure and stroke, half of American adults questioned in a recent poll say they've tried to cut back on sodium.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.