HIV vaccine might offer survival advantage

June 12, 2006

U.S. researchers say even if an HIV vaccine doesn't offer perfect protection against the virus, it might provide a survival advantage after infection.

Such a survival advantage was observed in two monkey studies sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

One team of researchers was led by Dr. Norman Letvin of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School and the NIAID Vaccine Research Center, while the other team was led by Mario Roederer of the VRC.

Both teams found monkeys vaccinated against simian immunodeficiency virus -- a close relative of HIV that causes an AIDS-like disease in monkeys -- and then exposed to the virus survived significantly longer than unvaccinated animals exposed to SIV.

The studies also identified a measurable marker of SIV vaccine effectiveness in monkeys -- something known as an immune correlate of vaccine efficacy. But the researchers say further study is needed to determine if the immune correlate could predict the effectiveness of a vaccine against HIV in humans.

The research appears in this week's issue of Science and this month's issue of the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Vaccine candidates protect against Zika virus in rhesus monkeys

Related Stories

Green monkeys acquired Staphylococcus aureus from humans

July 29, 2016

Many deadly diseases that afflict humans were originally acquired through contact with animals. New research published in ASM's Applied and Environmental Microbiology shows that pathogens can also jump the species barrier ...

A macaque model of HIV infection

June 2, 2016

Researchers have taken a major step toward developing a better animal model of human AIDS. Such a model could greatly improve researchers' ability to evaluate potential strategies for preventing and treating the disease.

HIV vaccine moves towards clinical trials

June 17, 2016

A vaccine for HIV developed by Oregon Health Sciences University in collaboration with the California National Primate Research Center is now moving towards clinical trials. The vaccine uses another virus, cytomegalovirus ...

Recommended for you

Force triggers gene expression by stretching chromatin

August 26, 2016

How genes in our DNA are expressed into traits within a cell is a complicated mystery with many players, the main suspects being chemical. However, a new study by University of Illinois researchers and collaborators in China ...

The sound of a healthy reef

August 26, 2016

A new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) will help researchers understand the ways that marine animal larvae use sound as a cue to settle on coral reefs. The study, published on August 23rd in the ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.