Researchers find gene linked to asthma

June 10, 2006

Danish scientists say they have found a gene with a direct link to asthma.

Researchers at the University of Southern Denmark and Odense University Hospital have been working on the problem since 1996, the Copenhagen Post reported.

"What makes our find so special is that we found an individual immunological gene that seems to be directly connected to the risk of developing asthma," the head of the research team, Torben Kruse, said. "Scientists have never been able to say the same before. Other findings have been described as possibly having an effect on allergies and eczema."

Kruse said the discovery is likely to lead to earlier detection and better treatment. But he said the causes of asthma are complicated and include environmental factors.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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