Survey: Meat eaters want no hormones

May 11, 2006

U.S. residents eat meat an average of 4.2 times a week, and most want assurances it was raised humanely and without antibiotics, a new survey found.

The main considerations for U.S. residents who put meat on the menu are flavor, safety and humane treatment of animals, said Texas-based Whole Foods Market, which sponsored the survey.

Sixty-five percent of Americans said they want a guarantee that all meat and poultry products are free from added growth hormones and antibiotics, and that the animals were humanely raised. Sixty-one percent of those surveyed said it was important that meat and poultry product labels include details on compliance with those standards.

Seventy-seven percent said they would be willing to spend more on meat if they were guaranteed the meat was consistently the best and most flavorful, while 59 percent said they wanted a guarantee the meat came from a trusted source and was raised naturally without growth hormones or antibiotics. Forty-three percent said they wanted a guarantee it was raised humanely in optimal living conditions for the species.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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