Pollinators focus of international conference

June 17th, 2010
The decline of pollinator populations around the world and the potential causes and cures for the decline will be the focus of the International Conference on Pollinator Biology, Health and Policy, July 24 - 28, 2010, Penn State's University Park campus.

Conference sessions will cover the behavioral ecology of such pollinators as butterflies, honeybees, leaf-cutting bees and bumblebees; worldwide pollinator status; the impacts of toxins; and pollinator policy. The conference will be a mixture of invited papers, submitted papers and poster presentations. Specific topics addressed will include disease ecology and honeybee losses, drug interaction effects in honeybees, social communication and honeybee health and the impact of white nose in brown bats on pollinator species.

Presentations will highlight pollinator work in the United States, Israel, Kenya, Switzerland, Brazil, France and other locations.

More information:
For more information about the conference or to register, go to http://guest.cvent.com/EVENTS/Info/Summary.aspx?e=6139b68a-3574-4699-b441-385ada31dac5

Provided by Penn State

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