PLOS authors can also publish on bioRxiv

May 1st, 2018
Power to the preprint
One small step for preprints, one giant step forward for open scientific communications. Credit: PLOS
Starting today, authors submitting their manuscript to most PLOS journals can also choose to post their article on bioRxiv, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory's preprint server for the life sciences. This is an important development for PLOS, for bioRxiv, for the authors we serve, and for the life sciences. For PLOS, it enables us to achieve a long-standing aspect of our vision to make research more quickly available to enable discovery and reuse. For bioRxiv, this development will augment the server's already rapidly climbing manuscript submission rate. And authors will gain the opportunity of sharing their work before peer review on a trusted platform.

"Collaborating with bioRxiv is part of a much bigger strategy for PLOS moving forward, one in which we'll renew our roots of being a catalytic open publisher," said Alison Mudditt, CEO of PLOS. "To accelerate innovation, we'll often act in partnership with others in the community, which will move us closer to our vision of how scientific communication should work."

"We warmly welcome the further integration of PLOS journals with bioRxiv," said John Inglis, co-founder of bioRxiv. "The server's goal is the acceleration of research and providing unrestricted access to manuscripts before they enter an often lengthy process of peer review is one of several ways bioRxiv is delivering on its promise."

So what are preprints exactly? A preprint is an openly available scientific manuscript that an author uploads to a public server like bioRxiv prior to peer review. The preprint contains data and methodologies and is typically the same manuscript that is submitted to a journal.

And why are preprints important? Well, for starters, early sharing of ideas can lead to new discoveries and collaboration, and early feedback can help improve your manuscript. We are committed to putting your science first. By allowing a submission to be posted on bioRxiv, authors accelerate the dissemination of their work and invite commentary by a broader community, which PLOS editors may evaluate as part of peer review.

So how will it work? In short, PLOS will perform initial manuscript screening compatible with bioRxiv standards, covering appropriate scope and article type, plagiarism detection, and other basic ethical and technical criteria. Articles will then post automatically to the bioRxiv server and be freely accessible online. Authors choose to opt-in to this process when they submit papers to PLOS.

Provided by Public Library of Science

This Phys.org Science News Wire page contains a press release issued by an organization mentioned above and is provided to you “as is” with little or no review from Phys.Org staff.

More news stories

Weaponizing oxygen to kill infections and disease

The life-threatening bacteria called MRSA can cripple a hospital since it spreads quickly and is resistant to treatment. But scientists report that they are now making advances in a new technique that avoids antibiotics. ...

The environmental cost of contact lenses

Many people rely on contact lenses to improve their vision. But these sight-correcting devices don't last forever—some are intended for a single day's use—and they are eventually disposed of in various ways. Now, scientists ...

Sightings, satellites help track mysterious ocean giant

The sight of a basking shark's brooding silhouette gliding through the waters off western France is more than just a rare treat for sailors—it is a boon for scientists trying to trace its secretive migrations across the ...

Magnetized inflow accreting to center of Milky Way galaxy

Are magnetic fields an important guiding force for gas accreting to a supermassive black hole (SMBH) like the one that our Milky Way galaxy hosts? The role of magnetic fields in gas accretion is little understood, and trying ...