Announcing the new Journal of Integrated Pest Management

October 1st, 2009
In spring 2010, the Entomological Society of America (ESA) will begin publishing the Journal of Integrated Pest Management (JIPM), a new, open-access, peer-reviewed, extension journal covering the field of integrated pest management. The Editors-in-Chief are Dr. Marlin E. Rice of Pioneer Hi-Bred International (formerly with Iowa State University) and Dr. Kevin L. Steffey of Dow Agrosciences (formerly with the University of Illinois).

The editors are requesting submissions of original, extension-type articles about any aspect of pest management in the broadest sense, including, but not limited to, management of pests that affect row crops, forage and grasslands, horticultural crops, forests, urban landscapes, structures, schools, households, livestock and pets, and human health. Articles should be written for one of the three following categories:

1) Profiles: These are biology and ecology profiles for insects pests such as soybean aphids, emerald ash borers, bed bugs, and others. Profiles will include an insect's scientific name, description of stages, biology, life history, host plants, potential for economic damage, sampling or scouting procedures, and management and control options.

2) Issues: These articles will focus on emerging integrated pest management issues such as "Transgenic Bt Cotton and Insect Management" or "Prevention and Management of Bed Bugs in Commercial Buildings." Articles will include information on the issue's relevance, why the issue developed, balanced perspectives on the issue, and possible solutions.

3) Recommendations: These articles will contain consensus-based, pest management recommendations on topics such as "Management of Cattle Ticks in the Southwestern U.S." or "Management of the Asian Longhorned Beetle in New England Urban Environments."

Recommendations will be based upon the principles of integrated pest management and supported by published research and validation data when available.

The intended readership for the journal will be any professional who is engaged in any aspect of integrated pest management, including, but not limited to, crop producers, individuals working in crop protection, retailers, manufacturers and suppliers of pest management products, educators, and pest control operators.

"Anyone with an interest in the practice of modern-day pest management and who has access to the Internet will be the target audience," according to Kevin Steffey.
As an open-access journal, there will be author publication fees for accepted manuscripts.

Source: Entomological Society of America

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