ASTRO honored with 2 Hermes Awards

June 4th, 2012
The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has been honored with two 2012 Hermes Creative Awards from the Association of Marketing and Communication Professionals (AMCP) for its work on the fall 2011 edition of ASTROnews and the Radiation Therapy for Cancer brochure. This is the sixth year in a row that ASTRO has received Hermes Awards.

The Hermes Creative Awards is an international competition for creative professionals involved in the concept, writing and design of traditional and emerging media. Entries come from corporate marketing and communication departments, advertising agencies, PR firms, design shops and freelancers.

There were over 4,700 entries from throughout the United States and several other countries in the 2012 competition. After two months of judging, the AMCP judges honored ASTROnews with the Gold Award in the Magazine category. The award is given for excellence in quality, creativity and resourcefulness. The Radiation Therapy for Cancer brochure received an Honorable Mention in the Brochure category for exceeding the high standards of the industry norm.

"Once again, our Communications Department has raised the bar on our publications," Laura Thevenot, ASTRO CEO, said. "These publications are essential for our membership and help to keep the Society and patients informed. It is such a privilege to receive these distinguished honors from the AMCP six years in a row."

Provided by American Society for Radiation Oncology

This Phys.org Science News Wire page contains a press release issued by an organization mentioned above and is provided to you “as is” with little or no review from Phys.Org staff.

More news stories

US scientists raise bar for sea level by 2100

In the last days of Barack Obama's administration, US government scientists warned even more sea level rise is expected by century's end than previously estimated, due to rapid ice sheet melting at the poles.

Biologists unlock code regulating most human genes

Molecular biologists at UC San Diego have unlocked the code that initiates transcription and regulates the activity of more than half of all human genes, an achievement that should provide scientists with a better understanding ...

Bursts of methane may have warmed early Mars

The presence of water on ancient Mars is a paradox. There's plenty of geographical evidence that rivers periodically flowed across the planet's surface. Yet in the time period when these waters are supposed to have run—three ...

Biologists identify reproductive 'traffic cop'

Before an egg becomes fertilized, sets of chromosomes must pair up to pass along genetic information. This happens within each reproductive cell, where separate chromosomes of male and female origin move toward each other ...

Swarm of underwater robots mimics ocean life

Underwater robots developed by researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego offer scientists an extraordinary new tool to study ocean currents and the tiny creatures they transport. ...