Related topics: international space station

Hibernating insects regrow muscles on demand

Even as gas prices soar, most people don't destroy their car's engine just to save energy—and that's one luxury certain insects have that those humans don't.

Smart earbud will measure how astronauts sleep

Sleep is important for our health and well-being, and bad sleep can negatively impact our attention span, memory, decision-making skills, creativity and judgment.

The amazing world of flame balls, doughnuts and horseshoes

Flame balls are gentle and fragile spherical flames that up till recently could only exist in conditions of near-zero gravity. Researchers at TU/e have managed to observe flameballs at normal earth-bound conditions, and thus, ...

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Weightlessness

Weightlessness is a phenomenon experienced by people during free-fall. Although the term zero gravity is often used as a synonym, weightlessness in orbit is not the result of the force of gravity being eliminated or even significantly reduced (in fact, the force of the Earth's gravity at an altitude of 100 km is only 3% less than at the Earth’s surface). Weightlessness typically occurs when an object or person is falling freely, in orbit, in deep space (far from a planet, star, or other massive body), in an airplane following a particular parabolic flight path (e.g., the “Vomit Comet”), or in one of several other more unusual situations.

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