Related topics: international space station

Image: The foam-coarsening experiment aboard the ISS

Another fluid experiment joins long running research on foam stability on the International Space Station. The Foam-Coarsening experiment, developed by Airbus for ESA, is scheduled to be activated this month in the Fluid ...

Making planets in a rocket

How are celestial bodies created? Aside from philosophical questions, researchers are taking practical steps to investigate the very first moments when planets are born—on a sounding rocket launching from Sweden next week.

Dusty vacuums may be astronauts' biggest health risk

Human lungs have proven to be remarkably adaptable to life in space, but dust may their biggest challenge, even greater than the lack of gravity, according to a leading aerospace medicine expert, writing in the Medical Journal ...

Martian soil detox could lead to new medicines

Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is one of humankind's major long-term health challenges. Now research into helping humans live on Mars could help address this looming problem.

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Weightlessness

Weightlessness is a phenomenon experienced by people during free-fall. Although the term zero gravity is often used as a synonym, weightlessness in orbit is not the result of the force of gravity being eliminated or even significantly reduced (in fact, the force of the Earth's gravity at an altitude of 100 km is only 3% less than at the Earth’s surface). Weightlessness typically occurs when an object or person is falling freely, in orbit, in deep space (far from a planet, star, or other massive body), in an airplane following a particular parabolic flight path (e.g., the “Vomit Comet”), or in one of several other more unusual situations.

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