Why your tuna could have 36 times more chemicals than others

Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego found levels of persistent organic pollutants as much as 36 times higher in the muscle tissue of yellowfin tuna caught in the more ...

Showdown looms for lucrative tuna industry

The future of the world's largest tuna fishery will be decided at a meeting in Australia this week, with Pacific island nations demanding tighter controls on a catch now worth US$7.0 billion a year.

Deepwater mystery: Oil loose in the Gulf

(AP) -- Streaming video of oil pouring from the seafloor and images of dead, crude-soaked birds serve as visual bookends to the natural calamity unfolding in the Gulf of Mexico.

Effective laws needed to protect large carnivores from extinction

Effective national and international laws are needed to reverse the decline of populations of large carnivores—such as tigers, wolves, and eagles—and reduce their risk of extinction, reports a paper published in Scientific ...

How short-term heat waves impact apex marine predators

A large team of marine scientists affiliated with a host of institutions across the U.S. has learned how some marine apex predators react to short-term heat waves. In their study, published in the journal Nature Communications, ...

Optimism for deal to lower Pacific tuna catches

Conservationists and fishing industry representatives expressed confidence Thursday they were close to agreement on cutbacks in the lucrative tuna fishing industry in the Pacific.

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