A study identifies 17 key compounds in wine aromas

Maybe words such as ethyl butanoate and octalactone sound unfamiliar to most people who drink wine. However, these substances are some of the ones that give this popular drink its own scent. A recent piece of research published ...

Transparent wood: the building material of the future?

When Timothée Boitouzet studied architecture in Japan, where buildings need to survive earthquakes, he realised the next smart material might be one that humans have used for thousands of years—wood.

A single-digit-micrometer thickness wood speaker

In a recent report on Nature Communications, Wentao Gan and a team of researchers at the departments of materials science and engineering in the U.S. have detailed the use of an ultrathin film of natural wood to create an ...

Sustainability of new creosote alternative confirmed

A recently published study has confirmed the sustainability credentials of a new biobased alternative to creosote that is being developed in the Bio4Products project. The use of wood modification based on pyrolysis oil was ...

Turning wood into pharmaceutical ingredients

Production of hazardous waste during drug manufacturing is a serious concern for the pharmaceutical industry. Typically, large amounts of flammable solvents are used during these processes, which usually require several steps ...

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Wood

Wood is an organic material; in the strict sense it is produced as secondary xylem in the stems of trees (and other woody plants). In a living tree it conducts water and nutrients to the leaves and other growing tissues, and has a support function, enabling woody plants to reach large sizes or to stand up for themselves. However, wood may also refer to other plant materials with comparable properties, and to material engineered from wood, or wood chips or fiber.

People have used wood for millennia for many purposes, primarily as a fuel or as a construction material for making houses, tools, weapons, furniture, packaging, artworks, and paper. Wood can be dated by carbon dating and in some species by dendrochronology to make inferences about when a wooden object was created. The year-to-year variation in tree-ring widths and isotopic abundances gives clues to the prevailing climate at that time.

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