Why do so many women leave biology?

The retention rate of women in the biological sciences, both in the United States and Canada, is lower than would be expected from the number of female doctoral students who graduated within the last decade, and lower than ...

Progress continues for women faculty, but gradually

(Phys.org)—When professor and astrophysicist Priya Natarajan read the recent Yale study on gender bias in academic research among scientists, she was surprised­—but not completely.

Marie Curie, go home: Science faculty study shows bias

(Phys.org)—A study published in PNAS shows that science faculty members, both men and women, need to bring up their poor grades in gender bias. The study. "Science Faculty's Subtle Gender Biases Favor Male Students," reveals ...

Faculty retention proves a major challenge for universities

Attracting and retaining the world's brightest students is on the mind of every university official. But a new, unprecedented study in the journal Science suggests leaders in higher education face an understated, even more ...

Women in science? Universities don't make the grade

Despite years of trying to improve the number of women undergraduates in science and engineering, a new study shows most universities are failing. Not only are women lagging behind their male classmates, efforts to close ...

Report: MIT makes strides with women scientists

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology has succeeded in boosting the number of women on its science and engineering faculties and in making the university a friendlier and more supportive place to work in the decade since ...

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