Honey bees study finds that insects have personality too

A new study in Science suggests that thrill-seeking is not limited to humans and other vertebrates. Some honey bees, too, are more likely than others to seek adventure. The brains of these novelty-seeking bees exhibit distinct ...

A willingness to be bullied may be inherited

(PhysOrg.com) -- A new study of the behavior of marmots suggests that a willingness to accept some extent of bullying, rather than shying away from interactions that could lead to conflict, may be inherited.

Cliches about nations govern our actions

Germans arrive at every appointment 5 hours before the scheduled time, all Indians are called Ranjid and have a red mark on their foreheads, the Japanese bow 10,000 times a day, and Americans all speak with chewing gum in ...

Evolution of lying

(Phys.org) —Ultimately, our ability to convincingly lie to each other may have evolved as a direct result of our cooperative nature.

Voters more inclined than consumers to pay for food safety

Voters are more willing to pay for a decreased risk of food-related illness than consumers, but female consumers are more willing to pay than male consumers, according to an international team of researchers.

Distracted drivers: Your habits are to blame

(Phys.org) —More than a decade of research has shown that using a handheld or hands-free phone while driving is not safe because the brain does not have enough mental capacity to safely perform both tasks at once.

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