Researchers identify leprosy in wild chimpanzees

An international team that includes researchers John Spencer, Ph.D., and Charlotte Avanzi, Ph.D., of the Colorado State University Mycobacteria Research Laboratories has identified leprosy in wild chimpanzees in the West ...

Female chimpanzees avoid humans

Female chimpanzees are less likely than males to go near villages and farmland used by humans, new research shows.

Copy or innovate? Study sheds light on chimp culture

Chimpanzees in one part of Guinea crack and eat nuts while others declined to do so even when offered tools, research published on Monday found, and the difference could shed light on their culture.

Cracking chimpanzee culture

Chimpanzees don't automatically know what to do when they come across nuts and stones. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now used field experiments to show that chimpanzees thus do not simply invent nut cracking ...

Human antibiotic use threatens endangered wild chimpanzees

It's well established that infectious disease is the greatest threat to the endangered chimpanzees made famous by the field studies of Jane Goodall at Gombe National Park in Tanzania. Now, new research led by scientists at ...

Similar to humans, chimpanzees develop slowly

Few species develop as slowly as humans, both in terms of developing adult skills and brain development. Human infants are born so underdeveloped that they cannot survive without adult care and feeding for some years after ...

Adolescent male chimps still need their mamas

Even kids who are nearly grown still need a parental figure to help them navigate the long path to adulthood—and our closest animal relatives are no exception.

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