African killifish becomes fastest maturing vertebrate on record

Annual killifish are known to live their lives at one of two speeds: "pause" or "fast-forward." For most of the year, the tiny freshwater fish persist as diapausing embryos buried in sediments across the African savannah, ...

Whole-genome sequencing of endangered mountain gorillas

The first project to sequence whole genomes from mountain gorillas has given scientists and conservationists new insight into the impact of population decline on these critically endangered apes. While mountain gorillas are ...

How pesticides change the environment

The number of humans on the planet has almost doubled in the past 50 years ‒ and so has global food production. As a result, the use of pesticides and their effect on humans, animals and plants have become more important. ...

Study shows animal life thriving around Fukushima

Nearly a decade after the nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan, researchers from the University of Georgia have found that wildlife populations are abundant in areas void of human life.

Keeping honeybees doesn't save bees – or the environment

It's no secret that bee populations are in decline across the UK and Europe. There has also been a fantastic increase in public awareness over the past few years, leading many to set up hives in their gardens and on their ...

Population boom preceded early farming

University of Utah anthropologists counted the number of carbon-dated artifacts at archaeological sites and concluded that a population boom and scarce food explain why people in eastern North America domesticated plants ...

Promiscuity may have accelerated animal domestication

Domestication of wild animals may have accelerated as promiscuity increased among the high density populations drawn to life near humans, according to a new paper by University of Liverpool researchers.

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