Related topics: new zealand · marine mammal · ocean · climate change · fossil

Killer whale DNA reveals distinct ties

Scientists have discovered that populations of Australasian killer whales revolve around matrilineal ties after using DNA to determine their populations across the region.

Can whale feces help save the planet?

The International Whaling Commission (IWC) was founded to regulate whaling. Today, it also increasingly focuses on the value of live whales for planetary health. A new workshop report confirms the great ecological value of ...

Acoustic research sheds new light on whale sounds 

Scientists from British Antarctic Survey (BAS), Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS), and international collaborators have this week published the first detailed research on the sounds made by southern right whales ...

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Whale

Whales are marine mammals of order Cetacea which are neither dolphins—members, in other words, of the families Delphinidae or Platanistoidae—nor porpoises. They include the blue whale, the largest living animal. Orcas, colloquially referred to as "killer whales", and pilot whales have whale in their name but for the purpose of biological classification they are actually dolphins. For centuries whales have been hunted for meat and as a source of valuable raw materials. By the middle of the 20th century, large-scale industrial whaling had left many species seriously endangered.

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