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We now know how insects and bacteria control ice

Contrary to what you may have been taught, water doesn't always freeze to ice at 32 degrees F (zero degrees C). Knowing, or controlling, at what temperature water will freeze (starting with a process called nucleation) is ...

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Italian ice

Italian ice is a frozen dessert made from either concentrated syrup flavoring or fruit purees. It is not shaved ice that is flavored, rather, it is made by the same process by which ice cream is made: mixing ingredients and pouring them into a batch freezer. Common flavors include cherry, coconut, piña colada, blueberry, and lemon. Some specialty shops also sell a wider array of flavors, such as cantaloupe, orange and chocolate.

In October 2007, Dennis Moore of "Little Jimmy's Italian Ice" in Elizabeth, New Jersey, submitted the term "Italian ice" as a possible addition to the Acceptable Identification of Goods and Services Manual of the United States Patent and Trademark Office. On November 8, 2007, this term was added, in International Class 030: Italian Ice. The most common flavors are lemon, cherry, and blueberry.

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