Related topics: climate change · ocean

Disrupting key protein alters biological rhythms in water flea

Researchers from North Carolina State University have shown that the E75 protein is a key regulator of some biological rhythms through interactions with nitric oxide. Suppression of E75 results in longer molt cycles and reduced ...

Research cruise explores carbon cycle in deep ocean in Atlantic

A University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science-led research cruise leaves for the deep Atlantic Ocean 50 miles southeast of Bermuda on Monday for a week of science at sea aboard the 171-foot R/V Atlantic Explorer. ...

NASA's Webb Telescope will survey Saturn and Titan

If you stop a random person on the sidewalk and ask them what their favorite planet is, chances are their answer will be Saturn. Saturn's stunning rings are a memorable sight in any backyard telescope. But there is still ...

Climate change enhances carbon dioxide flux from lakes

Boreal lakes play a significant role in global carbon cycling. Small and shallow lakes are abundant in northern areas, and they are often biologically active because of the loading of organic matter from the catchments. As ...

Our water cycle diagrams give a false sense of water security

Pictures of the earth's water cycle used in education and research throughout the world are in urgent need of updating to show the effects of human interference, according to new analysis by an international team of hydrology ...

page 1 from 19

Water cycle

The water cycle, also known as the hydrologic cycle, describes the continuous movement of water on, above, and below the surface of the Earth. Since the water cycle is truly a "cycle," there is no beginning or end. Water can change states among liquid, vapor, and ice at various places in the water cycle. Although the balance of water on Earth remains fairly constant over time, individual water molecules can come and go.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA