Fish and humans are alike in visual stimuli perception

Humans, fish and, most likely, other species rely on identical visual features—color, size, orientation, and motion—to quickly search for objects, according to researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU).

People find changes in user interfaces annoying

Researchers modelled learning and visual search and predicted how users learn new or partially changed user interfaces. The model shows that even small changes can disturb visual search and impede use.

Pinterest lets phones spy eye-catching items

Pinterest on Wednesday infused more machine smarts into its online bulletin boards, pushing harder into e-commerce by enabling people to use smartphones to identify products they might wish to pursue.

After security scandal, a tech firm says it's changing focus

A Silicon Valley startup says it's shutting down operations and shifting to a new business model after it was blamed earlier this year for turning unwitting computer users into targets for annoying web ads—and hackers.

Superfish points fingers over ad software security flaws

A little-known Silicon Valley startup was caught in a firestorm of criticism this week for making software that exposed Lenovo laptop users to hackers bent on stealing personal information. But Superfish Inc. has also won ...

New research reveals fish are smarter than we thought

(Phys.org) —A new study from researchers in our Department of Psychology with colleagues at Queen Mary University of London has reported the first evidence that fish are able to process multiple objects simultaneously.

Visual search to shop: gimmick or game changing?

Imagine using your phone to snap a photo of the cool pair of sunglasses your friend is wearing and instantly receiving a slew of information about the shades along with a link to order them.

US tightens guidance for online search ads

A US consumer watchdog agency told Internet search engines Tuesday to ensure they differentiate between search results and paid advertising, to steer clear of "deceptive" practices.

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