Related topics: brain · neurons

SLAP microscope smashes speed records

A new microscope breaks a long-standing speed limit, recording footage of brain activity 15 times faster than scientists once believed possible. It gathers data quickly enough to record neurons' voltage spikes and release ...

How did reading and writing evolve? Neuroscience gives a clue

The part of the brain that processes visual information, the visual cortex, evolved over the course of millions of years in a world where reading and writing didn't exist. So it's long been a mystery how these skills could ...

Why artificial intelligence is likely to take more lives

Artificial neurons for deeply intelligent machines – this is the new artificial intelligence (AI) revolution, led by Geoffrey Hinton and his team since 2012. That year, Hinton, an expert in cognitive science at the University ...

Artificial intelligence will make you smarter

The future won't be made by either humans or machines alone – but by both, working together. Technologies modeled on how human brains work are already augmenting people's abilities, and will only get more influential as ...

New developments enabling blind people to see again

Enabling blind people to see again is the dream of many neuroscientists. We still have a long way to go to make this happen, but we have also made a lot of progress over the last twenty years, says Richard van Wezel of the ...

Brain-computer interface could improve hearing aids

(Phys.org)—Researchers are working on the early stages of a brain-computer interface (BCI) that can tell who you're listening to in a room full of noise and other people talking. In the future, the technology could be incorporated ...

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Visual cortex

The term visual cortex refers to the primary visual cortex (also known as striate cortex or V1) and extrastriate visual cortical areas such as V2, V3, V4, and V5. The primary visual cortex is anatomically equivalent to Brodmann area 17, or BA17.

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