Related topics: light · infrared light

Running an LED in reverse could cool future computers

In a finding that runs counter to a common assumption in physics, researchers at the University of Michigan ran a light emitting diode (LED) with electrodes reversed in order to cool another device mere nanometers away.

Bubbles of brand new stars

This region of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) glows in striking colours in this image captured by the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). The region, known as LHA 120-N ...

Virtual lens improves X-ray microscopy

With X-ray microscopes, researchers at PSI look inside computer chips, catalysts, small pieces of bone, or brain tissue. The short wavelength of the X-rays makes details visible that are a million times smaller than a grain ...

Semiconductors combine forces in photocatalysis

A significant advance in the photocatalytic activity of conventional materials is demonstrated by a two-dimensional heterostructure comprising nanolayers of two semiconductors: black phosphorus and bismuth tungstate. As researchers ...

A novel material for transparent and flexible displays

The next generation of flexible and transparent displays will require a high-performing and flexible polymeric material that has the optical and thermal properties of glass. The material must be transparent to visible light ...

Novel material converts infrared light into visible light (Update)

Columbia University scientists, in collaboration with researchers from Harvard, have succeeded in developing a chemical process to absorb infrared light and re-emit it as visible energy, allowing innocuous radiation to penetrate ...

Seeing Titan with infrared eyes

Saturn's moon Titan is enveloped in a thick atmosphere, but through the infrared eyes of the international Cassini mission, the moon's myriad surface features are revealed in this exquisite global mosaic.

Scientists design new material to harness power of light

Scientists have long known that synthetic materials—called metamaterials—can manipulate electromagnetic waves such as visible light to make them behave in ways that cannot be found in nature. That has led to breakthroughs ...

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