Understanding vacuum fluctuations in space

An international research team from Germany and France has created structures in which light fields interact with electrons so strongly that the quantum vacuum itself is significantly altered. Using extremely short bursts ...

Fluc­tu­a­tions in the void

In quantum physics, a vacuum is not empty, but rather steeped in tiny fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. Until recently it was impossible to study those vacuum fluctuations directly. Researchers at ETH Zurich have ...

Studying the quantum vacuum: Traffic jam in empty space

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by Professor Alfred Leitenstorfer has now shown how to manipulate the ...

Team extends the lifetime of atoms using a mirror

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have succeeded in an experiment where they get an artificial atom to survive ten times longer than normal by positioning the atom in front of a mirror. The findings were recently ...

Scientists 'squeeze' light one particle at a time

A team of scientists has successfully measured particles of light being "squeezed", in an experiment that had been written off in physics textbooks as impossible to observe.

Boosting the force of empty space

Vacuum fluctuations may be among the most counter-intuitive phenomena of quantum physics. Theorists from the Weizmann Institute (Rehovot, Israel) and the Vienna University of Technology propose a way to amplify their force.

Controlling the emission of light? Size matters

In daily life light is often generated by spontaneous emission, for instance, in lighting, in LCD displays, and in DVD players. In this process, an excited quantum emitter, such as an atom, a molecule, or a quantum dot emits ...

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