Related topics: embryos

Lipid receptor fosters infection of the uterus in dogs

In the female dog, cells of the uterus can accumulate lipid droplets to form so-called foamy epithelial cells during late metoestrus. These cells produce a hormone that is involved in the implantation of the embryo in the ...

'Spermbots' could help women trying to conceive (w/ Video)

Sperm that don't swim well rank high among the main causes of infertility. To give these cells a boost, women trying to conceive can turn to artificial insemination or other assisted reproduction techniques, but success can ...

Researchers make racehorses fertile

Ten percent of mares have difficulties conceiving. But now two researchers from University of Copenhagen have discovered what the trouble is and have developed a product to help such horses become pregnant. Veterinarians ...

The ins and outs of building the sperm tail

Sperm swim, lung cells sweep mucus away, and the cells in the female Fallopian tube move eggs from the ovary to the uterus. Underlying these phenomena are flagella – slender, hair-like structures extending from the surface ...

Fish placenta is unfavourable survival strategy

Fish with a placenta struggle to adapt to rapid changes in the food supply. They probably evolved in a stable, food-rich environment. As ecosystems change under the influence of humans, they are experiencing greater difficulty ...

Pregnant rhino gives hope for Indonesian species

Indonesian conservationists Thursday hailed a breakthrough in efforts to save the critically endangered Sumatran rhino after a female called Ratu became pregnant in captivity.

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Uterus

The uterus (Latin word for womb) is a major female hormone-responsive reproductive sex organ of most mammals, including humans. It is within the uterus that the foetus develops during gestation. The term uterus is used consistently within the medical and related professions; the Germanic term, womb is more common in everyday usage. The plural of uterus is uteruses or uteri.

One end, the cervix, opens into the vagina; the other is connected on both sides to the Fallopian tubes.

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