New underwater robot swims and senses like a fish

In recent years, robotic underwater vehicles have become more common in a variety of industrial and civil sectors. They are used extensively by the scientific community to study the ocean. For example, underwater robots have ...

Japan, U.S. team deploys underwater robots to coast

A team of research and industry experts with four state-of-the-art small underwater vehicles from the United States-based Center for Robot-Assisted Search and Rescue (CRASAR) are working with the Japanese-based International ...

The deep sea, from a robot's perspective

Robots do not have to breathe. For this reason they can dive longer than any human. Equipped with the necessary sensor technology they inspect docks or venture down to the ocean fl oor to search for raw materials. At present, ...

Robotic fish aids understanding of how animals move

The weakly electric black ghost knifefish of the Amazon basin has inspired Northwestern University's Malcolm MacIver and an interdisciplinary team of researchers to develop agile fish robots that could lead to a vast improvement ...

Engineers hand "cognitive" control to underwater robots

For the last decade, scientists have deployed increasingly capable underwater robots to map and monitor pockets of the ocean to track the health of fisheries, and survey marine habitats and species. In general, such robots ...

Tiny reef speedster challenges tuna in the ocean sprint

(Phys.org)—Tiny coral reef wrasses can swim as fast as some of the swiftest fish in the ocean – but using only half as much energy to do so, Australian scientists working on the Great Barrier Reef have found.

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