Are MXenes the future of nanotechnology?

Artificial kidneys, powerful batteries and efficient water purification are some of the future applications of a group of ultrathin materials known as MXenes. This opinion is expressed in an article in the journal Science, ...

New light on making two-dimensional polymers

An international research team with members from Linköping University, the Technical University of Munich and the Deutsches Museum among others, has developed a method to manufacture two-dimensional polymers with the thickness ...

Creating perfect edges in 2-D-materials

Ultrathin materials such as graphene promise a revolution in nanoscience and technology. Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have published a study in Nature Communications in which they present a method ...

Electron sandwich doubles thermoelectric performance

Researchers more than doubled the ability of a material to convert heat into electricity, which could help reduce the amount of wasted heat, and thus wasted fossil fuel, in daily activities and industries.

Student researchers shed light on ultrathin materials

In 2014, electrical engineering major Alex Yore was looking for a way to get some hands-on experience in materials science when he stumbled upon something fortuitous—a new physics faculty member looking to get his lab up ...

Harnessing an unusual 'valley' quantum property of electrons

Yoshihiro Iwasa and colleagues from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science, the University of Tokyo and Hiroshima University have discovered that ultrathin films of a semiconducting material have properties that form ...

A new chapter of solar energy conversion and storage?

(Phys.org)—Using the power of the sun and ultrathin films of iron oxide (commonly known as rust), Technion-Israel Institute of Technology researchers have found a novel way to split water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen. ...

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