Related topics: breast cancer · genes · cancer · cancer cells

Tracking protein disposal could lead to improved therapies

Northwestern Medicine investigators developed a technique to catalog how cells dispose of unnecessary proteins, a process that has implications for cancer and autism-spectrum diseases, according to findings published in Nature ...

Structural insights into processes at DNA damage sites

Ishan Deshpande and his colleagues from the group of Susan Gasser and the Protein Structure Facility at the FMI elucidated the mechanism of how Mec1-Ddc2, a tumor suppressor involved in DNA damage response assembles at sites ...

SIRT6 ability to suppress cancer cell growth is explained

For several years, scientists have known that SIRT6 – one of seven sirtuins, a family of mammalian proteins with important biological functions, including promoting longer, healthier life – is a tumor suppressor. It has ...

Utilizing tumor suppressor proteins to shape nanomaterials

A new method combining tumor suppressor protein p53 and biomineralization peptide BMPep successfully created hexagonal silver nanoplates, suggesting an efficient strategy for controlling the nanostructure of inorganic materials.

Uncovering a novel mechanism in cell division

Northwestern Medicine scientists have revealed the role amino-terminal methylation plays in a specific protein in the centromere, a region of the chromosome important in cell division, and how the dysregulation of this protein ...

New insights into ubiquitin signalling

Scientists at the University of Würzburg have generated new insights into the intricate molecular underpinnings of ubiquitin signaling. Their results may provide new avenues for cancer therapy.

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Tumor suppressor gene

A tumor suppressor gene, or antioncogene, is a gene that protects a cell from one step on the path to cancer. When this gene is mutated to cause a loss or reduction in its function, the cell can progress to cancer, usually in combination with other genetic changes.

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