Scientists solve the riddle of zebras' stripes

Why zebras have black and white stripes is a question that has intrigued scientists and spectators for centuries. A research team led by the University of California, Davis, has now examined this riddle systematically. Their ...

Why parents in their prime produce the best offspring

Parents face a trade-off between putting resources into their offspring versus using resources to enhance their chances of survival so they can have more offspring. The best allocation of resources depends on age. More experienced ...

Lactating tsetse flies models for lactating mammals?

An unprecedented study of intra-uterine lactation in the tsetse fly, published 18 April 2012 in Biology of Reproduction's Papers-in-Press, reveals that an enzyme found in the fly's milk functions similarly in mammals, making ...

Parasite helps itself to sugar

Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite that causes sleeping sickness, is transmitted to mammals by the tsetse fly, and must adapt to the divergent metabolisms of its hosts. A new study shows how it copes with the frugal diet offered ...

Eliminating the fly or the disease?

Cattle in Burkina Faso affected by animal trypanosomosis contracts the disease not only via the tsetse fly, but also via other bloodsucking insects. The findings of a new study at the Institute of Tropical Medicine and the ...

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