Poison frog tadpoles can survive (almost) anywhere

A group of researchers from the University of Jyväskylä and Stanford University were part of an expedition to French Guiana to study tropical frogs in the Amazon. Amphibian species of this region use ephemeral pools of ...

Tree choices important for addressing climate change

Tree species in Africa's upland mountain rainforests can adapt both photosynthesis and leaf metabolism to warming. But the ability to do so varies from species to species, according to studies from a new doctoral dissertation.

Microscopic fossils record ancient climate conditions

Fifty-six million years ago, as the Earth's climate warmed by five to eight degrees C, new land mammals evolved, tropical forests expanded, giant insects and reptiles appeared and the chemistry of the ocean changed. Through ...

Nearly a fifth of Earth's surface transformed since 1960

Whether it's turning forests into cropland or savannah into pastures, humanity has repurposed land over the last 60 years equivalent in area to Africa and Europe combined, researchers said Tuesday.

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Tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forests

Tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forests (TSMF), also known as tropical moist forests, are a tropical and subtropical forest biome.

Tropical and subtropical forest regions with lower rainfall are home to tropical and subtropical dry broadleaf forests and tropical and subtropical coniferous forests. Temperate rain forests also occur in certain humid temperate coastal regions.

The biome includes several types of forests:

Tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forests are common in several terrestrial ecozones, including parts of the Afrotropic (equatorial Africa), Indomalaya (parts of the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia), the Neotropic (northern South America and Central America), Australasia (eastern Indonesia, New Guinea, northern and eastern Australia), and Oceania (the tropical islands of the Pacific Ocean). About half of the world's tropical rainforests are in the South American countries of Brazil and Peru. Rain forests now cover less than 6% of Earth's land surface. Scientists estimate that more than half of all the world's plant and animal species live in tropical rain forests.

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