How many ants are on Earth? 20 quadrillion, study says

There are at least 20 quadrillion ants on Earth, according to a new study that says even that staggering figure likely underestimates the total population of the insects, which are an essential part of ecosystems around the ...

Competition limits the ranges of mountain birds

A new study helps reveal why tropical mountain birds occupy such narrow elevation ranges, a mystery that has puzzled scientists for centuries. While many assumed temperature was responsible for these limited distributions, ...

Birds are more colourful closer to the equator, study proves

When European naturalists traveled to the tropics in the 1800s, they postulated that birds became more colorful closer to the equator—a theory that scientists confirmed on Monday using artificial intelligence technology.

What bird beaks say about tropical biodiversity

Areas of the globe where fruit-eating birds have wider beaks also have larger palm fruits, a new study shows. This sounds banal, but it provides new insights into tropical biodiversity and clues for solving species conservation, ...

Benefits of cacao farms for birds and bats

Cacao farms not only provide us with the pleasure of chocolate, but also offer potential advantages for biodiversity-friendly agriculture. The benefits to biodiversity have been widely studied in tropical rainforests, but ...

Bird communities threatened by urbanization

Urbanization is one of the most drastic forms of land-use change, and its negative consequences on biodiversity have been studied extensively in temperate countries such as Germany. However, less research has been conducted ...

Warming climate slows tropical birds' population growth rates

The mountain forests of Tanzania are more than 9,300 miles away from Salt Lake City, Utah. But, as in eastern Africa, the wild places of Utah depend on a diversity of birds to spread seeds, eat pests and clean up carrion. ...

In a warming climate, can birds take the heat?

We don't know precisely how hot things will get as climate change marches on, but there's reason to believe animals in the tropics may not fare as well as their temperate relatives. Many scientists think tropical animals, ...

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