Researchers sequence myrtle rust genome

The invasive fungus myrtle rust has been attacking native plants, driving some to the brink of extinction. Dr Peri Tobias and her team hope that sequencing the entire genome can help the plants fight back.

Bread mould avoids infection by mutating its own DNA

Whilst most organisms try to stop their DNA from mutating, scientists from the UK and China have discovered that a common fungus found on bread actively mutates its own DNA as a way of fighting virus-like infections.

The basis of glyphosate resistance in amaranth

William T. Molin (U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Stoneville, MS) teamed up with Allison Yaguchi, Mark Blenner, and Christopher A. Saski (Clemson University, SC) to sequence and dissect the structure ...

'Jumping genes' help stabilize DNA folding patterns

"Jumping genes"—bits of DNA that can move from one spot in the genome to another—are well-known for increasing genetic diversity over the long course of evolution. Now, new research at Washington University School of ...

Study reveals a role for jumping genes during times of stress

Only 1 percent of human DNA codes for proteins, and approximately half of the rest of the genome is made up of what used to be called "junk" sequences that can copy themselves into RNA or DNA and jump from one location to ...

Almond and peach tree genomes shed light on their differences

Humans have been eating peaches and almonds for thousands of years. Although at first sight the products of these trees may seem to be very different, both species are part of the Prunus genus, and are genetically very similar—so ...

Taming the genome's 'jumping' sequences

The human genome is fascinating. Once predicted to contain about a hundred thousand protein-coding genes, it now seems that the number is closer to twenty thousand, and maybe less. And although our genome is made up of about ...

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