Two-dimensional material seems to disappear, but doesn't

(Phys.org)—When exposed to air, a luminescent 2D material called molybdenum telluride (MoTe2) appears to decompose within a couple days, losing its optical contrast and becoming virtually transparent. But when scientists ...

Researchers observe electrons zipping around in crystals

The end of the silicon age has begun. As computer chips approach the physical limits of miniaturization and power-hungry processors drive up energy costs, scientists are looking to a new crop of exotic materials that could ...

In probing mysteries of glass, researchers find a key to toughness

Glass doesn't have to be brittle. Scientists propose a way of predicting whether a given glass will be brittle or ductile—a property typically associated with metals like steel or aluminum—and assert that any glass could ...

Surprising discoveries about 2-D molybdenum disulfide

Scientists with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have used a unique nano-optical probe to study the effects of illumination on two-dimensional semiconductors at the ...

New physics in a copper-iridium compound

(Phys.org) —An unexpected magnetic behavior within Sr3CuIrO6, a transition-metal compound (TMC) that combines the transition metal copper with the transition metal iridium has been revealed by research at the U.S. Department ...

New 2-D quantum materials for nanoelectronics

Researchers at MIT say they have carried out a theoretical analysis showing that a family of two-dimensional materials exhibits exotic quantum properties that may enable a new type of nanoscale electronics.

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