Two-dimensional material seems to disappear, but doesn't

(Phys.org)—When exposed to air, a luminescent 2D material called molybdenum telluride (MoTe2) appears to decompose within a couple days, losing its optical contrast and becoming virtually transparent. But when scientists ...

An efficient path from carbon to renewable fuel production

Earth-abundant materials based primarily on carbon, nitrogen and transition metal oxides can be combined into highly efficient energy conversion devices. These devices can be used in fuel cells as well as in electrolysis. ...

New 'knobs' can dial in control of materials

Designing or exploring new materials is all about controlling their properties. In a new study, Cornell scientists offer insight on how different "knobs" can change material properties in ways that were previously unexplored ...

Transparent oxide glass with rubber-like property

Flexible substances that can withstand high temperatures are much sought after for various industrial and engineering applications. Types of glass made from oxides are hard at room temperature and fracture easily, but scientists ...

New 2-D quantum materials for nanoelectronics

Researchers at MIT say they have carried out a theoretical analysis showing that a family of two-dimensional materials exhibits exotic quantum properties that may enable a new type of nanoscale electronics.

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