A microlaser emitting helical light

Researchers recently demonstrated the realization of an integrated microlaser based on a novel design that emits light in chiral modes, thus producing corkscrews of light. An object is said to be chiral if it can be distinguished ...

Can microswimmers swim through gel?

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have studied how microswimmers, like bacteria or sperm, swim through fluids with both solid and liquid-like properties, e.g., gels. They found that subtle changes in a swimmer's ...

Emerging magnetism on vibrating non-magnetic layers

A team of researchers, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has demonstrated the possibility to induce and control a magnetic response in a nonmagnetic layer material though ...

Neutrons reveal the wild Weyl world of semimetals

The observation of an abnormal state of matter in a two-dimensional magnetic material is the latest development in the race to harness novel electronic properties for more robust and efficient next-generation devices.

A necklace of fractional vortices

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have arrived at how what is known as time-reversal symmetry can break in one class of superconducting material. The results have been published in the highly ranked Nature ...

Researchers use sound to slow down, speed up, and block light

How do you make an optical fiber transmit light only one way? Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have experimentally demonstrated, for the first time, the phenomenon of Brillouin Scattering Induced ...

Shaking the topological cocktail of success

Graphene is the miracle material of the future. Consisting of a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, the material is extremely stable, flexible, highly conductive and of particular interest for electronic ...

Researchers forward quest for quantum computing

Research teams from UW-Milwaukee and the University of York investigating the properties of ultra-thin films of new materials are helping bring quantum computing one step closer to reality.

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