A celebrated AI has learned a new trick: How to do chemistry

Artificial intelligence has changed the way science is done by allowing researchers to analyze the massive amounts of data modern scientific instruments generate. It can find a needle in a million haystacks of information ...

First 3D structure of regulator protein revealed

Proteins are indispensable components in living organisms. They are not only "building material" for the body—they also make molecular communication between cells possible, they are needed for nerve impulses to occur, and ...

2D material in three dimensions

The carbon material graphene has no well-defined thickness; it merely consists of one single layer of atoms. It is therefore often referred to as a "two-dimensional material." Trying to make a three-dimensional structure ...

How a viral RNA changes shape to hijack host cells

University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus researchers have observed how an RNA molecule from a virus forms a complex, three-dimensional structure, and is able to change its shape to hijack host proteins. The details ...

Preventing toxoplasmosis parasite infection

Toxoplasma gondii, the parasite responsible for toxoplasmosis, is capable of infecting almost all cell types. It is estimated that up to 30% of the world's population is chronically infected, the vast majority asymptomatically. ...

Superflimsy graphene turned ultrastiff by optical forging

Graphene is an ultrathin material characterized by its ultrasmall bending modulus, superflimsiness. Now the researchers at the Nanoscience Center of the University of Jyväskylä have demonstrated how an experimental technique ...

Reverse engineering 3-D chromosome models for individual cells

Genome analysis can provide information on genes and their location on a strand of DNA, but such analysis reveals little about their spatial location in relation to one another within chromosomes—the highly complex, three-dimensional ...

Magnetic vortices come full circle

Magnets often harbor hidden beauty. Take a simple fridge magnet: Somewhat counterintuitively, it is 'sticky' on one side but not the other. The secret lies in the way the magnetisation is arranged in a well-defined pattern ...

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