Harvesting energy from devices

If there's one thing nearly all modern technology has in common, it's heat. Whether it's your car, computer, television, or even refrigerator, they all generate large amounts of heat. And nearly all of it goes to waste.

Exotic alloys for potential energy applications

The search for thermoelectrics, exotic materials that convert heat directly into electricity, has received a boost from researchers at the California Institute of Technology and the University of Tokyo, who have found the ...

Fujifilm breaks record with thermoelectric material

(Phys.org)—Photographic film maker Fujifilm has been busy this year at the Nanotech 2013 conference being held in Tokyo. First came news of bendable/roll up speakers. Now the company is showing off a new thermoelectric ...

Team demonstrates new hybrid nanomaterial for power generation

A University of Texas at Arlington physics professor has helped create a hybrid nanomaterial that can be used to convert light and thermal energy into electrical current, surpassing earlier methods that used either light ...

With new design, bulk semiconductor proves it can take the heat

The intense interest in harvesting energy from heat sources has led to a renewed push to discover materials that can more efficiently convert heat into electricity. Some researchers are finding those gains by re-designing ...

Reliable nuclear device to heat, power Mars Science Lab

NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission, which is scheduled to launch this week, has the potential to be the most productive Mars surface mission in history. That's due in part to its nuclear heat and power source.

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