Related topics: james webb space telescope · galaxies · nasa · earth · stars

Starry tail tells the tale of dwarf galaxy evolution

A giant diffuse tail of stars has been discovered emanating from a large, faint dwarf galaxy. The presence of a tail indicates that the galaxy has experienced recent interaction with another galaxy. This is an important clue ...

NASA's Webb Telescope receives top space foundation award

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope team has been selected to receive the 2023 John L. "Jack" Swigert, Jr., Award for Space Exploration, a top award from the Space Foundation. This annual award honors a space agency, company, ...

Nine new and exotic creatures for the pulsar zoo

Researchers using MeerKAT in South Africa have discovered nine millisecond pulsars, most of them in rare and sometimes unusual binary systems, as the first result of a targeted survey. An international team with significant ...

Astronomers confirm age of most distant galaxy using oxygen

A new study led by a joint team at Nagoya University and the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan has measured the cosmic age of a very distant galaxy. The team used the ALMA radio telescope array to detect a radio ...

Webb spies Chariklo ring system with high-precision technique

In 2013, Felipe Braga-Ribas and collaborators, using ground-based telescopes, discovered that Chariklo hosts a system of two thin rings. Such rings had been expected only around large planets such as Jupiter and Neptune.

A new approach to solving the mystery of dark energy

What is behind dark energy—and what connects it to the cosmological constant introduced by Albert Einstein? Two physicists from the University of Luxembourg point the way to answering these open questions of physics.

Were galaxies much different in the early universe?

An array of 350 radio telescopes in the Karoo desert of South Africa is getting closer to detecting "cosmic dawn"—the era after the Big Bang when stars first ignited and galaxies began to bloom.

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Telescope

A telescope is an instrument designed for the observation of remote objects by the collection of electromagnetic radiation. The first known practically functioning telescopes were invented in the Netherlands at the beginning of the 17th century. "Telescopes" can refer to a whole range of instruments operating in most regions of the electromagnetic spectrum.

The word "telescope" (from the Greek tele = 'far' and skopein = 'to look or see'; teleskopos = 'far-seeing') was coined in 1611 by the Greek mathematician Giovanni Demisiani for one of Galileo Galilei's instruments presented at a banquet at the Accademia dei Lincei. In the Starry Messenger Galileo had used the term "perspicillum".

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