What gives bees their sweet tooth?

Scientists have discovered bees linger on a flower, emptying it of nectar, because they have sugar-sensing taste neurons which work together to prolong the pleasure of the sweetness.

Fruit fly hunger games—taste neurons in control

A team of neuroscientists from the Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown (CCU), in Lisbon, Portugal, has discovered that specific taste neurons located in the fruit fly's proboscis confer a craving for protein. The results, ...

Researchers show how insect food choice can be manipulated

Researchers at the University of California, Riverside have found a way to access and manipulate taste neurons in the pharynx (throat) of the common fruit fly that could help control the spread of mosquito-related illnesses, ...

Pregnancy changes perception of odours and tastes

The perception and reactions to odours and tastes can change in pregnancy, sometimes dramatically. This is also true for flies. The mechanisms, however, that trigger these changes are not understood in either mammals or insects. ...

Taste sensors in fly legs control feeding

Feeding is essential for survival. Senses such as smell or sight can help guide us to good food sources, but the final decision to eat or reject a potential food is controlled by taste. Scientists have examined the anatomy ...

Bittersweet: Bait-averse cockroaches shudder at sugar

Sugar isn't always sweet to German cockroaches, especially to the ones that avoid roach baits. In a study published May 24 in the journal Science, North Carolina State University entomologists show the neural mechanism behind ...

Scientists discover how chemical repellants trip up insects

Fire up the citronella-scented tiki torches, and slather on the DEET: Everybody knows these simple precautions repel insects, notably mosquitoes, whose bites not only itch and irritate, but also transmit diseases such as ...

page 1 from 1