Quantum gas turns supersolid

Researchers led by Francesca Ferlaino from the University of Innsbruck and the Austrian Academy of Sciences report in Physical Review X on the observation of supersolid behavior in dipolar quantum gases of erbium and dysprosium. ...

Disrupting crystalline order to restore superfluidity

What if you could disrupt the crystalline order of quantum matter so that a superfluid could flow freely even at temperatures and pressures where it usually does not? This idea has been demonstrated by a team of scientists ...

Secrets of superfluid helium explored

When Cornell physicists Robert Richardson, David Lee and Douglas Osheroff received the 1996 Nobel Prize for their discovery of the superfluid state of liquid helium, it was only the beginning. Now a new team of Cornell researchers, ...

Surprising nature of quantum solitary waves revealed

Solitary waves – known as solitons – appear in many forms. Perhaps the most recognizable is the tsunami, which forms following a disruption on the ocean floor and can travel, unabated, at high speeds for hundreds of miles.

X-ray laser probes tiny quantum tornadoes in superfluid droplets

An experiment at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory revealed a well-organized 3-D grid of quantum "tornadoes" inside microscopic droplets of supercooled liquid helium – the first time this formation ...

Researcher studies unsolved problem of interacting objects

(Phys.org) —One of science's biggest puzzles is figuring out how interacting objects behave collectively. Take water, for example. "It's a molecule, but it's also a liquid with specific properties," says Daniel Sheehy, ...

Dense hydrogen in a new light

(Phys.org) —Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe. The way it responds under extreme pressures and temperatures is crucial to our understanding of matter and the nature of hydrogen-rich planets.

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