Sweet sorghum promising for the environment

Sweet sorghum can be used to produce biogas, biofuels, and novel polymers. In addition, it can help replace phosphate fertilizers. A new sweet sorghum variety developed at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) accumulates ...

Virus transmission: New animation gives insight to viral spread

How can an influenza virus transfer from animals to humans even though the molecules on which they land at the cell surface are different? To find out, researchers of the University of Twente developed a sensor chip that ...

Endangered swift parrots favor sons despite female shortage

New research from The Australian National University (ANU) shows female swift parrots can determine the sex of their offspring, and they are favoring boys over girls as they face diminished survival prospects in the wild.

Sweet marine particles resist hungry bacteria

A major pathway for carbon sequestration in the ocean is the growth, aggregation and sinking of phytoplankton—unicellular microalgae like diatoms. Just like plants on land, phytoplankton sequester carbon from atmospheric ...

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Sugar

Sugar (see below for etymology) is a class of edible crystalline substances, mainly sucrose, lactose, and fructose. Human taste buds interpret its flavor as sweet. Sugar as a basic food carbohydrate primarily comes from sugar cane and from sugar beet, but also appears in fruit, honey, sorghum, sugar maple (in maple syrup), and in many other sources. It forms the main ingredient in candy. Excessive consumption of sugar has been associated with increased incidences of type 2 diabetes, obesity and tooth decay.

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