Fish sperm race for reproductive success

Norwegian researchers show that the sperm of Arctic char, a cold-water fish common to alpine lakes, swim at different speeds in different fluids, depending on whether the fish are dominant or submissive. The finding published ...

Flowers use physics to attract pollinators

A new review indicates that flowers may be able to manipulate the laws of physics, by playing with light, using mechanical tricks, and harnessing electrostatic forces to attract pollinators.

Mate-guarding behaviour favours a familiar face

Okayama University researchers confirm the role of mate-guarding in males for blocking the female's visual familiarity with rival males to improve mating success in a medaka fish model.

Study reveals human ability to make ourselves sound bigger

Research from the University of Sussex suggests that humans are unique among primates in being able to intentionally alter the frequencies of our voices to sound larger or smaller than we really are, a capacity that is likely ...

Choosy sage-grouse select nest sites to maximize their success

Do sage-grouse know what's good for them when choosing where to nest? That's the question at the heart of a new study in The Condor: Ornithological Applications, in which researchers examined the habitat preferences of these ...

Alaska's shorebirds exposed to mercury

Shorebirds breeding in Alaska are being exposed to mercury at levels that could put their populations at risk, according to new research from The Condor: Ornithological Applications.

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