How the zebrafish got its stripes

Animal patterns—the stripes, spots and rosettes seen in the wild—are a source of endless fascination, and now researchers at the University Bath have developed a robust mathematical model to explain how one important ...

It's all a blur—why stripes hide moving prey

Scientists at Newcastle University have shown that patterns—particularly stripes which are easy to spot when an animal is still—can also help conceal speeding prey.

How the zebrafish got its stripes

Stripes are common in our lives. It's a pretty basic pattern, and easy to take for granted.

Predators might not be dazzled by stripes

Stripes might not offer protection for animals living in groups, such as zebra, as previously thought, according to research published in Frontiers in Zoology. Humans playing a computer game captured striped targets more ...

The colour of love: Zebrafish perform colorful courtship displays

Billy Ocean may not have been thinking of fish when he wrote "The Color of Love", but Sophie Hutter, Attila Hettyey, Dustin Penn, and Sarah Zala from the Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology of the University of Veterinary ...

Record number of jaguars uncovered in Bolivia

In a new camera trap survey in the world's most biologically diverse landscape, researchers for the Wildlife Conservation Society have identified more individual jaguars than ever before.

Scientists crack code on tracking zebras

Field biologists following thousands of wild zebras in Africa used to joke about how nice it would be to have a bar code reader to help them identify and catalogue individual animals.

Tracking tigers in 3-D

New software developed with help from the Wildlife Conservation Society will allow tiger researchers to rapidly identify individual animals by creating a three-dimensional model using photos taken by remote cameras. The software, ...

page 1 from 1