Related topics: global warming

The air above Antarctica is suddenly getting warmer

Record warm temperatures above Antarctica over the coming weeks are likely to bring above-average spring temperatures and below-average rainfall across large parts of New South Wales and southern Queensland.

Super volcanic eruptions interrupt ozone recovery

Since the Antarctic ozone hole was detected in 1985, depletion of the ozone layer—the "big umbrella" that protects all life on Earth—has raised considerable concern. The efforts of international communities led to the ...

Warming in the stratosphere leads to cold winters

In the first week of January, the Arctic stratosphere suddenly warmed up, an occurrence known as "sudden stratospheric warming" (SSW). This phenomenon results in cold winter weather, just the kind we are facing now – ETH ...

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Stratosphere

The stratosphere is the second major layer of Earth's atmosphere, just above the troposphere, and below the mesosphere. It is stratified in temperature, with warmer layers higher up and cooler layers farther down. This is in contrast to the troposphere near the Earth's surface, which is cooler higher up and warmer farther down. The border of the troposphere and stratosphere, the tropopause, is marked by where this inversion begins, which in terms of atmospheric thermodynamics is the equilibrium level. The stratosphere is situated between about 10 km (6 miles) and 50 km (31 miles) altitude above the surface at moderate latitudes, while at the poles it starts at about 8 km (5 miles) altitude.

The word stratosphere is from the Greek meaning 'stratified layer'.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA